We believe storytelling holds the power to help us more deeply know ourselves, relate to each other more meaningfully, and connect us to the history, memory and tradition of being Jewish.

The authors of Jewish& hold their Judaism fully and fully hold a diversity of racial, ethnic and cultural identities.

These are their stories.

Featured Story

A Special Father-Son Duo and Their Unique Indian Charoset

A recipe for making Indian Passover Seder treat.

Featured Story

A Special Father-Son Duo and Their Unique Indian Charoset

Latest Stories

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Jewish Rituals

Stories About Passover

Italian Passover Customs and Recipes

Italian Passover Customs and Recipes

Ruth’s Cup: A New Passover Ritual Honoring Jewish Diversity

Ruth’s Cup: A New Passover Ritual Honoring Jewish Diversity

Moroccan Passover Traditions and Recipe

Moroccan Passover Traditions and Recipe

A Sephardic Passover Meat Pie

A Sephardic Passover Meat Pie

Italian Passover Customs and Recipes

Italian Passover Customs and Recipes

Ruth’s Cup: A New Passover Ritual Honoring Jewish Diversity

Ruth’s Cup: A New Passover Ritual Honoring Jewish Diversity

Moroccan Passover Traditions and Recipe

Moroccan Passover Traditions and Recipe

A Sephardic Passover Meat Pie

A Sephardic Passover Meat Pie

Featured Author

Haftam Yitzhak Heathwood

Haftam Yitzhak Heathwood

Haftam Yitzhak Heathwood was born in Ethiopia in 1987 during a time of civil war and famine. ...

What We’re
Reading

I Run to Make My Heart Beat

I Run to Make My Heart Beat

Rachel Kahn, Art by Aude Massot

In this comic set in France, we follow Nina, whose Jewish and Black identities are navigated on the track field. “I Run to Make My Heart Beat” explores the experience of growing up, being mixed, and how our families shape the people we hope to be.

I was born in the 1970s, in France. A child of the first visible generation with a “mixed-race” heritage. My roots trace back to a West African immigrant from the post-colonial era and an Eastern European deportee who miraculously returned from the horrors of the death camps.

Telling the story of when, as a child, my father, a Senegambian, and my grandfather, a Polish Jew, spoke French to each other with their respective accents. A testament to the unity our family managed to forge-a harmony painted with word balloons and vibrant colors, much like our deeply humane family.” -Rachel Kahn